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Office wear – Hoxton or Mayfair?

Written by on 21st May 2014
Category: Business travel and relocation

Did you clip on your cuff links and straighten your pocket scarf this morning? Or did you squeeze into your skinny jeans and step into your trainers?  What you wear to work is important, but depending on where you work this can mean different things. Running shoes on the way into work, ‘smart casual’ dress codes and dress down Fridays; business attire has caused a stir amongst workers for some time. So should the traditional suit and tie be worn within every type of business? 

Whilst having regular business meetings with clients and property partners, it’s best to be prepared and to dress smartly every day. Your wardrobe choice influences the perception of you and if you’ve dressed to impress, then you probably will. But is it only worth putting on a suit for business meetings? When visitors come into the office and see your work colleague walk past in flip flops and shorts, is this a true representation of your company? In an office where brown tan shoes are frowned upon and beards have to be fully formed, we’re far from the alternatively dressed workers of East London.

We’re not saying that if you’re a ‘Hoxton hipster’ and you opt for a cardigan knit and braces that you’re not suitably dressed. They say dress for the job you want, not the job you have. If you’re in a creative industry, a black suit may not reflect your true persona. Similarly, turn up to an interview in The City wearing a t-shirt and trainers and you  won’t be taken seriously. As we liaise with corporate clients on a daily basis, we insist on being consistent in our smart attire and we try to reflect the ideals of our clients and partners. Employees are ambassadors of the brand and we want to show that we mean business.

Get your wardrobe into relaxed mode with a stay at one of our London serviced apartments the next time you’re stopping by the capital for a business visit.